WHAT IS DISC?

DISC is a powerful tool for obtaining a new appreciation for our unique personality type and its effect on our everyday lives.

The DISC model is a positive framework and not a way to “label” others or ourselves.

By understanding ourselves through the DISC unique personality type assessment we will be encouraged to be our best, resulting in improved work productivity, teamwork and communication. What’s more, healthy, positive relationships come from having a better understanding of others and ourselves.


DOMINANT:

Direct
Focused
Robust
Strong-Willed
Determined
Objective Driven

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CAUTIOUS:

Reserved
Private
Calculating
Precise
Competent
Analytical

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INSPIRING:

Outgoing
Lively
Involved
Enthusiastic
Influencing
Optimistic 

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SUPPORTIVE:

Patient
Tactful
Stable
Even-tempered
Shy
Accommodating

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WHY DISC?

We apply the DISC model with four main personality types that allow it to be used appropriately as an effective and encouraging tool:

  • A positive approach is used to highlight and encourage our strengths
  • A positive approach to address our possible challenges
  • We recognise that we all have a unique blend of all four-personality types to a greater or lesser extent.
  • We recognise that behavioural patterns are fluid and dynamic as a person adapts to his or her environment

The DISC model provides a common language that we can use to better understand ourselves and adapt our behaviours with others – within a work team, a sales relationship, a leadership position, or other relationships.

HOW DISC PROFILES CAN HELP YOU AND YOUR TEAM ACHIEVE BETTER PRODUCTIVITY?

  • Have a better understanding of how we respond to conflict, what motivates us, what causes us to stress and how we solve problems
  • Have a better understanding of working relationships by recognizing the communication needs of team members
  • Improve leadership tasks by implementing better teamwork and minimise team conflict
  • Lead more effectively by understanding the dispositions and priorities of employees and team members
  • Be more self-knowledgeable, well-rounded and effective leaders
  • Build stronger teams enabling better productivity and profitable results
  • Better customer service by understanding teams strengths

 

DISC HISTORY

Marston was a lawyer and a psychologist; he also contributed to the first polygraph test, authored self-help books and created the character Wonder Woman. His major contribution to psychology came when he generated the DISC characteristics of emotions and behaviour of normal people. Marston, after conducting research on human emotions, published his findings in his 1928 book called Emotions of Normal People in which he explained that people illustrate their emotions using four behaviour types: Dominance (D), Inducement (I), Submission (S), and Compliance (C). Also, he argued that these behavioural types came from people’s sense of self and their interaction with the environment.[1] He included two dimensions that influenced people’s emotional behaviour. The first dimension is whether a person views his environment as favourable or unfavourable. The second dimension is whether a person perceives himself as having control or lack of control over his environment. His work was the foundation of the DISC assessment that has been used by more than 50 million people since it was first introduced in 1972.

Although Marston contributed to the creation of the DISC assessment, he did not create it. In 1956, Walter Clarke, an industrial psychologist, constructed the DISC assessment using Marston’s theory of the DISC model. He did this by publishing the Activity Vector Analysis, a checklist of adjectives on which he asked people to indicate descriptions that were accurate about themselves. This assessment was intended for use in businesses needing assistance in choosing qualified employees.

About 10 years later, Walter Clarke Associates developed a new version of this instrument. It was called Self Description. Instead of using a checklist, this test forced respondents to make a choice between two or more terms. Factor analysis of this assessment added to the support of a DISC-based instrument. Self Description was used by John Geier to create the original Personal Profile System in the 1970s. Through hundreds of clinical interviews, he furthered the understanding of the 15 basic patterns discovered by Clarke.

Since then, a number of publishers have updated and/or generated their own versions of the DISC assessment. In 1984, Jack Morrison’s doctoral dissertation, A Correlation Study of the Personal Profile System with the Sixteen Personality Factors Questionnaire concluded that the DISC has construct validity with significant correlations compared to the 16 PF strongly suggesting that it has scientific validity as a psychometric instrument.

History Source from Wikipidia –
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DISC_assessment

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